Shaila’s Weblog

Posts Tagged ‘blogging

I am talking about the blog search industry. This industry continues to battle a number of unresolved issues that need to be address. The Google Blog Search, launched in 2005, has failed to gain authoritative market share.

Unlike most competitors to Google, Technorati still seems to have a legitimate shot at beating Google in its niche. And though some traffic analysis sites have reported that Google Blog Search is edging out Technorati in terms of search traffic, they also note that more than half of that traffic stems from links on Google News.

Media Evangelist Simon Owens has written a good piece about Google and Technorati’s blog search. Going through his article, you can feel that there’s likely a room for somebody new.

IF you would like to explore the microblog limit of 140 characters then you can join the time-challenged mob of adults and quickly adopting kids who twitter! The bottom line is Twitter is another tool for fans, community, brand building and sharing. The question is Should you Twitter???

I think if you have an enterprise or are your own business, like many artists are, then yes, I think you should consider Twittering. Its simple, its easy and its quick. And here’s why. This is where the new business is going – it’s going to the web and since this is how they play, then if you don’t want to be left behind, you might consider playing there too 🙂

Twittering isn’t for you if:

  • your audience doesn’t use it
  • you absolutely don’t have time
  • you don’t care about listening
  • you don’t like sharing

More Tips on Twittering Real Good from some bright minds
Check back often as I will be updating this whenever I come across a great article.

  • How To Use Twitter by Guy Kawasaki, the power entrepeneur, explains how he uses Twitter as a Twool. Excellent advice and some more great reasoning on why you should use Twitter as a marketing tool.
  • Twitter Power Guide eBook. For the more advanced Twitter user familiar with Google Reader, RSS and Yahoo Pipes, this FREE ebook is just out from Christopher Penn – savvy marketer, blogger, podcaster and podcamp founder. Not to be missed.

Web giant Google rolls out first ad campaign on US networks to promote web browser Chrome

Google has launched its first television advertising campaign across a range of US networks.

The company’s TV adverts are an attempt to draw the public’s attention to Chrome, the web browser that it launched last year in an attempt to compete with Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

The company has famously avoided traditional marketing in the past – indeed, its website boasts that it has become “one of the world’s best known brands almost entirely through word of mouth”.

But Google is desperate to raise the profile of Chrome, which launched to great fanfare last September but has so far failed to make major inroads on its competitors.

According to statistics from Net Applications, Internet Explorer continues to win the browser wars with a market share of 66%. In second place is Mozilla’s Firefox, which is used by 22% of web users, while Apple’s Safari program comes third with 8%.

Chrome, meanwhile, is the choice of just 1.4% of internet users.

It remains to be seen how mainstream audiences will respond to the clip, however, which has no voiceover, does not mention the fact that it is advertising a web browser and only displays the Google logo at the very end.

The campaign is also an attempt to highlight the effectiveness of the company’s TV Ads system, which lets Google act as a broker to sell advertising time on television networks. Most advertisers and TV broadcasters consider the scheme to be an interesting but niche experiment, after striking just a handful of high-profile deals since it first began two years ago. Google is hoping that the Chrome campaign can help push the concept of using TV Ads into the minds of media executives.

The 30-second spot shows a stop-motion animation in which a tray of children’s play bricks is rearranged to resemble a browser window – an image intended to represent the simplicity and ease of using Chrome.

In a statement on the official Google blog, the company said that the video was made by a team from Google Japan as a YouTube clip, but had proved so successful that it had decided to take it on to traditional television.

“After releasing this video on the web, we got lots of positive feedback and thoughtful comments,” said the company. “We designed a Google TV Ads campaign which we hope will raise awareness of our browser … we’re excited to see how this test goes and what impact television might have on creating more awareness of Google Chrome.”

British charity fundraiser Ben Southall won the “best job in the world” on Wednesday – caretaker of an Australia tropical island – after an innovative marketing campaign that highlighted the power of social media.

ben-southh1
Southall, 34, was picked from 16 final contestants in a highly publicised contest by Tourism Queensland which attracted 34,684 video entries from almost 200 countries and surpassed all expectations in promoting tourism in the Australian state.

ben-southhall

The job description? Explore the islands of the Great Barrier Reef for six months and report back to Tourism Queensland and the world via blogs, a photo diary, video updates and interviews.

best-job

Also, if you feel like it, feed the fish, collect the mail and clean the pool – and collect a wage of A$150,000 ($110,000)

While the job itself attracted global attention so did the campaign by the government body Tourism Queensland as it highlighted how companies can tap the power of online social media such as YouTube and Facebook, for marketing.

ben-southhall1

“This is probably the first time that a campaign has achieved this sort of reach with so little advertising spend other than a few strategically place job ads around the world,” said Australian marketing analyst Tim Burrowes, editor of media and marketing website Mumbrella.

“This has all been about the power of people passing things on, largely through YouTube. The main lesson to be learned here is that if you have an original, exciting idea that gets people talking you don’t need so spend huge on advertising.”

The “Best Job in the World” campaign began in January with Tourism Queensland launching a tourism advertising campaign centered around the lure of “the best job in the world.”

Within days the campaign went viral as applicants from all over the world sent in 60-second video applications and news of the contest spread progressive on social networking sites such as Facebook and the video sharing site YouTube.

Pets come in our lives like a season of spring. Spreading joy and happiness all around they make the best companions. John is a big pet lover. From birds to fishes, or dogs to kittens, John have them all. To him nothing is more pleasurable than watching his angelical pets loitering here and there in joy.

John believes that everything has a purpose, so does the moments we spend with out pets. Their whole life is a lesson, its just that we need to learn.

We all are supposed to grow old! I know how difficult it is difficult to imagine when we first adopt our lively and rambunctious puppy or kitten that he or she will one day grow old. Our animal companions live far shorter than we do, and the time we spend with them seems to fly by. One day, they are full of vim and vigor, fun and mischief, joie de vivre and exuberance – within a relatively brief period of time, they grow into adolescence, then evolve into perhaps a mellower and sedate adulthood, and eventually become mature and ultimately old.

As they become old, they may experience physical as well as mental and emotional limitations and weakening. They may experience many of the illnesses, disabilities, infirmities and diseases that we may confront. So many of our beloved pets endure the pain of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart conditions, etc. as well as receiving medical treatments and medications that are comparable to those used to help ease or cure these conditions and improve the quality of our lives.

There are many lessons we can learn from our furry, finned and feathered friends, as they grow old. We can see them experience the effects of the passage of time that are so similar to those we experience as humans. We come to realize that these signs of aging both mirror and mimic our own. If we are wise, we can derive great rewards by caring for our aging pets – for example, we can learn from their stoicism, endurance and their ability to “Keep On Keeping On.” We can learn to “live in the moment”, as they do, with joy and spontaneity and not to dwell on the past or to fear the future.

By respecting and caring for our aging animal companions, we can learn to age gracefully and with dignity. From them, we can learn respect for and increased appreciation of our elders. We can emulate their steadfastness and patience. We can also view the opportunity to care for our beloved aging pets as a means for us to grow in compassion, wisdom and insight about the purposefulness and significance of all living beings.

The Russian Navy or VMFR (Russian: Военно-Морской Флот (ВМФ) России- Voyenno-Morskoy Flot Rossii (VMF) or literally Military Maritime Fleet of the Russian Federation) is the naval arm of the Russian Armed Forces. The international designation of Russian naval vessels is “RFS” – “Russian Federation Ship”.

The Russian Navy possesses the vast majority of the former Soviet naval forces and currently comprises the Northern Fleet, the Russian Pacific Fleet, the Russian Black Sea Fleet, the Russian Baltic Fleet, the Russian Caspian Flotilla, Naval Aviation, Naval Infantry (marines) and coastal artillery.

Broadly speaking, the navy’s role is to provide sea-based nuclear deterrence and to support Russia’s wider interests. Roughly one-third of naval personnel serve on the high seas, with other concerns being naval aviation, training, coastal defence, shore support, communications and maritime border duties.


While the SSBN fleet is contracting – perhaps to a force of 25-30 vessels – there is considerable effort in developing the SSN fleet, with the `Akula II’ and Severodvinsk classes replacing dated `Victor I’ and `II’ class submarines. The construction of surface vessels, by contrast, is slow and largely limited to smaller combatants, notably the Neustrashimy class frigate and Sovremenny II destroyer.


There is a realisation among Russian policy makers of the need to maintain a credible naval capability. Speaking in November 1999 Prime Minister Putin announced that a decree on the modernisation of the fleet was to be drafted and that the aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov was to be deployed to the Mediterranean in 2000. This marks a pattern of increasing Russian naval activity that has seen attack submarines operate in the Cold War stamping grounds of the Mediterranean and Eastern Pacific, carrying out simulated attacks on US naval forces. According to senior US intelligence analysts the Russian Navy is operating in a manner very similar to that of the Soviet fleet during the Cold War. Crucially however, Russian naval strength has seriously declined, with only 20 first class attack submarines in operating condition.

Bunol (Spain): Spanish revellers have pelted each with 113 tonnes of ripe tomatoes in an annual food fight. Town hall says an estimated 40,000 people took part in the hour of messy fun in the village of Bunol near Valencia. The ritual dates back to the 1940s.

Some warriors in Wednesday’s battle wore swimming goggles to protect themselves from the acid sting of projectiles in the form of pear-shaped tomatoes. Others swatted them away with tennis rackets.

Afterward, many washed off in a nearby river while crews hosed down a town painted red.


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